Literacy

Monday, March 9th, 2009

Dene Grigar writes in a recent EBR piece

So, the issue is not that elit is not taught in the academy, but rather it has not yet become an organized field of study anywhere save cutting edge institutions. So, in reality, unless it is an English Department where a Kate Hayles or Joe Tabbi works, a Digital Humanities Program where a Matthew Kirshenbaum teaches, or a Writing program where a Nick Montfort is on faculty, Michael Joyce’s work will not receive the same level of attention that James Joyce’s does.

Hopefully, soon, this will be changing at Tunxis. New Media docs are almost done.

In any case, Grigar is perceptive on the subject of literacy questions, where I think many contra-tech issues arise

Gallix’s essay and the anti-technology comments it spurred has become for me a metaphor for all that is flawed in our perception about the relationship between technology and writing, from the level of what we write, to that of how we write, to finally the way in which we disseminate our writing.

John and I were talking about this issue today. Digital writing and literature is still very young as a physical presence. In my mind, it still wears a soft skin. In fifty years, maybe it will become a turtle.


3 responses to “Literacy”

  1. Mary Ellen says:

    In 50 years? It will be driving a convertible, have a pierced ear, alimony payments, and a young, pretty girlfriend.

  2. The Turtle says:

    I haven’t finished reading Dene’s piece yet but a strong thought on this is still to consider the audience and the need in order to promote it. The ends justify the means and so should mold the process. Right now, this appeals very much to a very small population. And think, were classes needed to inspire people to play Pac Man?

  3. Mary Ellen says:

    Exactly. But now Pac Man is noted as something that happened on the way to someplace grander. Maybe we are witnessing the revolution, and in 50 years they will talk about those things called books, that were quaint and served a purpose until we figured out how to implant stories on our irises. (That’s about how I equate Pac Man to, say, End War.)