Science and Technology

Monday, November 24th, 2008

I just wrote a long note at change.gov concerning the technology area in the agenda section. The emphases on the transition website express priorities and thinking I’ve been hungering for from a government run by responsible adults. Here’s partly what I responded to, under the preparation section:

Make Math and Science Education a National Priority: Recruit math and science degree graduates to the teaching profession and support efforts to help these teachers learn from professionals in the field. Work to ensure that all children have access to a strong science curriculum at all grade levels.

This is laudable but as a priority it limits the scope of realistic initiative in “technology” which is and has always been more that the sum of science and mathematics. Smart users of technology may not be mathematicians and scientists; nor will good science and math teachers touch every area where technology is important for designers, writers, and coders. In new media, science works with art or should to innovate and change systems.

We need rounded priorities, don’t we? On the change.gov website technology needs greater diversity. Some mention of hypertext would be nice.


2 responses to “Science and Technology”

  1. Josh says:

    “I’ve been hungering for from a government run by responsible adults…”

    I sincerely hope that you do not become disconnected from the American political system after you watch the Obama Administration govern these next four years. Expect gridlock between the White House and Congress since there will be too many massive political egos in play in the Democrat Party come January 20th.

    Education cannot be fixed on a national level, Steve. Despite our disagreement there, it will never be higher on the DC agenda than national security, the economy/taxes, health care, infrastructure, and climate change for this Administration.

    Education will remain (as it should) a state issue.

    I agree with your view of technology and how it must be approached within education.

  2. Steve says:

    People need to get over their egos and get to work.

    For a frame of reference consider reading Ivan Illich’s Deschooling Society http://www.amazon.com/Deschooling-Society-Open-Forum-Illich/dp/0714508799/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1227666129&sr=1-1. I think you’ll find it interesting in its deinstitutionalizing frameworks.