This is not Poetry

Friday, March 30th, 2007

In this article yanked from the Hartford Courant, we have examples of the wonderful world of the language of politics

Gonzales and the White House made the final decision to proceed with the plan, Sampson said. “I don’t think the attorney general’s statement that he was not involved in any discussions about U.S. attorney removals is accurate,” Sampson said.

and

Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., the top Republican on the panel, said Sampson’s testimony did more to cloud Gonzales’ future than clear up the controversy. “I think there are more questions,” Specter said, adding that there was now “a real question as to whether he’s acting in a competent way as attorney general.”

The White House stepped back from defending Gonzales even before Sampson finished testifying.

“I’m going to have to let the attorney general speak for himself,” White House spokeswoman Dana Perino said.

Even so, President Bush “is confident that the attorney general can overcome these challenges, and he continues to have the president’s support,” said White House spokesman Tony Fratto.

Typically, when words like “accuracy,” “speak for himself,” “is confident,” “competent,” and “I think” are used by spokespeople and those in Congress all kinds of other things are meant. We could revise the language this way

What he said was bullshit.

and

He’s an asshole and I’m one for not admitting it.

and

I wish I were invisible.

and

We’ll just make like Rumpelstiltskin.

In an opinion piece, found here, Larry McHugh writes

Study after study has demonstrated the significance of education in the lives of young people. The better the education, and the earlier it begins, the better. The governor and General Assembly have always recognized the importance of education, but we are at a critical juncture. Moving education front and center in the current legislative session, as a harbinger of comprehensive action before adjournment, is about as good as it gets for our state’s business community.

“Study after study has . . . ” And this means what? I guess it’s okay to reference studies as a convention in this kind of writing. Most people, however, just open their eyes in the morning. “The better the education, and the earlier it begins, the better.” There are better ways of expressing this and they don’t involve circles.


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