what does the link mean?

Thursday, September 30th, 2004

But remediation allows for afterthought, and this is where I went: Beside the wooden bridge and railroad trestle, along the banks there are no Union soldiers, but instead the men are raggy-clothed and skinning possum for a meal. But hyper-reality, not fiction, changed the links to empty banks.

New Haven city streets where beggars sat on blankets at the front doors of the Malley’s, Eli Moore’s and Kresge’s to catch the shoppers at their slower pace. These too, are gone.

This is a great transition in terms of carrying over an “impled” link in terms of the hypertextual, a technique I’ve been thinking a lot about lately.

In the writing, what is the nature of the link?


2 responses to “what does the link mean?”

  1. gibb says:

    I’m not really sure, but links tend to lead us on a different path, or clarify where we are. In this case, the link (image of thought) remained within the same space (the river bank) but brought us into a new time and changed the characters. Then the words “hyper-reality” and “links” brought us even further into the future which is in fact, the present.

    The “implied” link connected the “hobos” (also implied by their clothes and meal and location) to their city brethren. Evidently, from what I think you’re saying, “links” have always existed in writing. Hypertext is just a new way of getting them off the page and into a new space.

    I realize that I’m analyzing my own words, but I do see them differently as you have them taken out of context here, and can focus on the links rather than on the flow of the original story. That is to say, again, unplanned and so, new to me. But it is an obvious and natural process, to spark the thoughts to different paths,no?

  2. steve says:

    I’ll be putting up a few examples of link structures soon so we’ll see how others seek continuity. It should be interesting, then we can extend the discussion.